Canal House – Ben Shannon, Hannah Platt, Jamie Hutchinson, Dave Rivers, Rick Carr, Jim Bayes, Tony Wright, Scott Bennett and Thomas Rackham (Mc)

Last night I was in Nottingham at the Canal House for the NCF £1 night, an evening that is going from strength to strength. There was over 100 people in last night and I’m wondering if a change in the seating to ensure that no one is sat too far away from the stage may be in order – if it can be done so as not to lose capacity, as this is a gig that is surely only a matter of time away from people having to book in advance. It was nice to see Alex Leam present, even if not gigging. I was much impressed with the list of Elliott and thought it a nice way of making a serious point, but less so with Bobby Roode’s walk on music as it is still running on a loop in my head and seems set to stay there for the foreseeable future.

Thomas Rackham (MC)

Rackham is a very genial compere and whilst he hasn’t got the hard edges that can intimidate an audience into behaving, he has likeability and so the result is the same. One thing that did slightly puzzle me about Rackham’s compering was that he had a very good story about a stag night that had taken place (tonight at least) in Nottingham and he used this in response to a girl being a bridesmaid this weekend coming. I was rather surprised that he didn’t use this sooner as it went down a treat and really gave Rackham a link to the audience. The punters at NCF are comedy literate and see a lot of comperes, so it was great to see some nicely quirky elements to Rackham’s work. These make a nice change to the standard cheer ifs and splitting rooms down the middle and I think the crowd appreciated them, too. The foot massage line was great as was the cake, even if I’m not personally sure of the relative merits of gluton free. It’s a shame that the lights were in Rackham’s eyes, as he did seem to spend a lot of his night with his arm in front of his face, as if ready to shield himself from a blow.

Ben Shannon

Shannon is an act whom I’ve never seen compere, but I would like to. He is quite easily distracted and has a free style that would play well with audience work. Last night he had something of a mixed time. I enjoyed the misdirection gag that he began with, after he had been surprised by a chap popping up on the front row from under a table. This was followed by some material where I had very little idea where Shannon was taking us, but I was very interested in finding out, as it was all pretty intriguing. This reminded me of Dan Nicholas, as he, too, is capable of surprise reveals. This was a set with a lot of ups and downs, the room being with Shannon for some, but not all of his work. However, this was new material and so that is par for the course. Just as Shannon seemed to be getting into a rhythm, there was a brief flash of a light and he mistook this for the end of his time and came off before this set had reached critical mass, which was unlucky.

Hannah Platt

Platt’s set was quite frustrating. On a technical level it was very promising. Structurally, this was a well put together set, she knows the value of a slight pause before the reveal and her energy in delivering it was in synch her material. However, it was mostly depressing in tone – abortion and self-harming aren’t easy to make funny. The darker areas did tee up the lighter topics for a nice contrast and could perhaps be seen more as set ups to these areas. However, I believe that the room kept slipping only for her to have to try to regain it with these lighter areas. This was a set that was clever and awkward in possibly equal measure, but for it to work better it may need something more, such as a longer slot so that the audience can build their confidence in her ability to take them to dark places and for the pay off to be worth the journey; over 8-10 minutes I’m not convinced this occurred.

Jamie Hutchinson

I was really pleased to see Hutchinson on the bill. It had been a year since I’d last seen him and I was very curious as to how he had progressed in the meantime and the answer is he has improved no end. His timing was better and his manner of speaking really added a lot to his set. Hutchinson emphasises the last syllable of a word and whether this is deliberate or natural, the result is a forceful delivery that was very in-keeping with his on stage persona. The material was solid and Hutchinson seemed to be close to an applause break throughout his set. This was very enjoyable.

Dave Rivers

Rivers is another act whom I’d not seen for a fair amount of time, so he was another nice addition to the bill. His set was good, with some very nice touches such as Campaign Mode and his delivery kept the room engaged. I think that Rivers has a lot going for him, but to make the most of this, he’ll need to gig more frequently as he wasn’t quite as sharp as when I’d last seen him.

Rick Carr

Carr was an interesting act. His delivery was smooth and polished and his material was good. There were some very nice bits in his set, such as memorable and the bouncing tales (Raoul Moat is a reference that isn’t going to age well, though). However, there weren’t many surprises in the reveals. It’s not that his set was predictable, because it wasn’t, it was just a case of 1 + 1 coming out at 2 every time and it would have been nice for it to have equalled 3 once with there being a twist in a reveal. This was an enjoyable set and Carr was very amiable with it – I think he has potential.

Jim Bayes

When I first saw Bayes was performing I expected him to be the MC, as this is what he is best known for (not quite pigeon holed, yet, though) and he is very good at it. Hence it was nice to see him doing some new material instead. Bayes is a confident presence and the room quickly warmed to him. His delivery is effervescent and he brightens up any room. Bayes’ material was nicely varied and went down very well.

Tony Wright

I’d seen Wright before, performing in Wollaton and he has come a long way in the six months or so since then. Tonight he was the only act who was smartly dressed, which wouldn’t suit all acts, but in Wright’s case it adds a certain something to his presence. Wright was quietly well spoken, having a very correct form of diction and this, combined with his sartorial taste gave him an air of polish. The material was much improved upon what I’d seen before and this was a set that was very well written indeed. It flowed in a way that was very smooth and there were few bits that didn’t add to the whole. I thought that Tufty could have perhaps been edited down slightly and still got the same result and I was a touch surprised that the Jesus material didn’t contain an Easter reference, as that would have been seasonal, but they were the only two minor things that didn’t please me. This was a very clean set, which made the occasion when Wright did swear all the more effective. There was a lot to like about this set.

Scott Bennett

Bennett came to the stage clipboard in hand, reminding me of an infinitely more funny version of Dennis Norden. This was new material being tried out/polished. It’s very hard to judge Bennett’s new material, as he delivers it so skilfully that even very new routines such as hand car wash feel as if they are well established. The warranty expiration line was superb as was Forsyth. Wet wipes shows promise and the only bit that didn’t really land well (and even this was something of a relative term) was duplo, which was related to a topic just a bit out of step with the rest of the set.